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4 edition of The effects of anxiety on restrained and unrestrained eaters found in the catalog.

The effects of anxiety on restrained and unrestrained eaters

Traci Lyn McFarlane

The effects of anxiety on restrained and unrestrained eaters

by Traci Lyn McFarlane

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Published by National Library of Canada in Ottawa .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.A.)--University of Toronto, 1993.

SeriesCanadian theses = Thèses canadiennes
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 microfiche : negative.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15101614M
ISBN 100315869712
OCLC/WorldCa46530460

Restrained and unrestrained eating 1. C Peter Herman. Corresponding Author. Northwestern University. Requests for reprints should be sent to C Peter Herman, Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois Search for more papers by this author. Deborah Mack. The Effects of Reduced Food Size and Package Size on the Consumption Behavior of Restrained and Unrestrained Eaters. By Maura L. Scott, Stephen M. Nowlis, For restrained eaters, overconsumption of the small food in small packages results from a lapse in self-control caused by the stress of perceiving conflicting food information: the small.

  Stress and Eating You crave rich foods when stress is unrelenting. And a very special and well-meaning collaboration between your brain and your body makes you do it. RESULTS: Restrained participants instructed to suppress food-related thoughts demonstrated significantly more food and eating-related thoughts than unrestrained participants. Preloading was associated with an increase in the frequency of indirect mentions to food and eating.

The effect of brand names on flavor perception and consumption in restrained and unrestrained eaters Article in Food Quality and Preference 28(2)– June with Reads. Stress and Eating Disorders High Risk Model of Threat Perception. Ian Wickramasekera developed the High Risk Model of Threat Perception (HRMTP), which provides us with a solid model to explain the effects of chronic stress, somatization, and eventual organic disease. The factors that are the greatest contributors to death and physical disease are chronic stress-related disorders, including.


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The effects of anxiety on restrained and unrestrained eaters by Traci Lyn McFarlane Download PDF EPUB FB2

Restrained eaters consumed more than unrestrained following the reaction time task, while the opposite was observed following relaxation.

The findings of this study show that disinhibited eating of restrained eaters can be triggered by the distracting effects of a cognitively demanding task and may be independent of anxiety by: There was a significant moderating effect of restrained eating, with a hyperphagic response to work stress in restrained eaters, compared with no effect in unrestrained eaters.

Conclusion: The results indicate that the associations between restraint and stress-induced eating that have been observed in the laboratory extend to the real-life by:   This study examined the effects of active (AC) and passive coping (PC) stress tasks on food intake in female restrained (n=20) and unrestrained eaters (n=20).Participants completed a reaction time task (AC), a cold-pressor test (PC), and a relaxation control condition separated by Cited by: Restrained eaters are also less physically active after consuming fitness-branded food, and food consumption volumes mediate this effect in restrained eaters.

Fitness branding may therefore have undesirable effects on the weight-control behaviors of restrained eaters because it discourages physical activity despite an increase in consumption Cited by:   Restrained and emotional eaters overeat in response to stress.

To compare differential effects of cognitive demand and ego-threatening stressors on subsequent chocolate intake, 38 females completed a neutral (control), an ego threatening and an incongruent Stroop colour-naming task on three separate by:   The effect of deprivation on food cravings and eating behavior in restrained and unrestrained eaters.

Int J Eat Disord. ; 38 (4): – [ PubMed ] [ Google Scholar ]. unrestrained eaters, restrained eaters were just as likely to start eating the M&Ms, regardless of food type for (p all main effects and interactions), but, as our results dem.

There was a significant moderating effect of restrained eating, with a hyperphagic response to work stress in restrained eaters, compared with no effect in unrestrained eaters. Conclusion: The results indicate that the associations between restraint and stress-induced eating that have been observed in the laboratory extend to the real-life setting.

The relationship between emotion and eating has been explored in laboratory studies as well. Several studies have examined the effects of anxiety 2 on eating among restrained and unrestrained eaters (See Greeno & Wing,for a summary).

These studies have consistently shown that restrained eaters consume more when anxious than when not. In this study we examined the effects of anxiety and food deprivation on the amount of food consumed ad lib by dieters and nondieters.

Eighty female college students served as subjects in an ostensible market research study in which an anxiety manipulation was embedded. Reassignment of the subjects to anxiety condition on the basis of self-reported anxiety produced a significant (p.

Compared to unrestrained eaters, restrained eaters were just as likely to start eating the M&Ms, regardless of food type (p > for all main effects and interactions), but, as our results demonstrate, restrained eaters found it more difficult to stop eating once they had started, particularly when eating the small food in small packages.

This study examined the effects of active (AC) and passive coping (PC) stress tasks on food intake in female restrained (n = 20) and unrestrained eaters (n = 20) Participants completed a reaction. This study investigated the attentional control of restrained eaters when exposed to food.

Restrained (N = 55) and unrestrained eaters (N = 56) completed a color word Stroop –down attentional control was assessed by adaptation effects (the Stroop effect is smaller when the previous trial is an incongruent color word than a congruent color word). Restrained eaters attend more strongly to food- and diet-related cues than do unrestrained eaters, as evidenced in both their eating behavior and their attention and memory responses to such cues.

The effect of mood states on eating behavior among restrained and unrestrained eaters (13 2 pp.) Director: D.

Balfour Jeffrey, Ph % Emotional states and eating behavior are commonly linked in eating disorder literature for both professionals and lay persons.

Negative affective states usually provoke overeating among persons on a diet. Less. Differential effects of active and passive stress on food intake in restrained and unrestrained eaters.

Appet – Lester, NA, Keel, PK, Lipson, SF (). PDF | On Mar 1,Janet Polivy and others published Overeating in Restrained and Unrestrained Eaters | Find, read and cite all the research you need on ResearchGate. Shuaiyu Chen, Todd Jackson, Debo Dong, Xuemeng Zhang, Hong Chen, Exploring effects of single-session anodal tDCS over the inferior frontal gyrus on responses to food cues and food cravings among highly disinhibited restrained eaters: A preliminary study, Neuroscience Letters, /, ().

Third, we hypothesized that in background with food objects and presence of Stroop effect, reaction time in restrained eaters is more than unrestrained eaters. Subsequently, three-way interaction was tested.

In multivariate tests, the three-way interaction effect was significant (GG=, F =, p. Disinhibition also can occur among restrained eaters who falsely believe that they have just eaten a high-calorie food, or in the presence of stress or anxiety. Unraveling the relationship of restraint to disinhibited eating is critical to contextualize studies that prospectively associate eating restraint with weight gain in adult women (9.

Restrained eaters tend to increase and unrestrained eaters to decrease their food intake when stressed. This relationship, though robust, does not appear to be caused by restrained eating or by stress per se. For restraint, evidence indicates that none of the common operationalizations of restraint .When confronted with an anxiety-producing threat to self-esteem, restrained eaters (dieters) increase their food consumption.

The functional explanation suggests that increased eating temporarily counteracts or masks dysphoria for the restrained eater; externality or stimulus sensitivity theories propose that distress shifts the dieter's attention to external stimulus properties (e.g., taste.().

The influence of restrained and external eating patterns on overeating. (). The predictors of thought suppression in young and old adults: Effects of anxiety, rumination and other variables.

(). The specificity of restrained versus unrestrained eaters‟ responses to food cues: general desire to eat, or craving for the cued food.